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such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get there. african-american voters, 85%. hispanics 66. and those are the fundamentals of the democratic party, 85% of democrats saying it will improve. in which of the following closest to coming to think the presi
education and retirement. >> on the tax side, as part of the adults of a solution, to you think the gap between the way work is tax and investment and capital gains are taxed -- does that have to narrow as part of the final solution? >> i think so. capital gains going up 20%, some people suggest even more. that is something we should look at. there is concern about that. the differential is one of the reasons why will the americans pay so little. ann romney be one of them. it is not really fair. he thought it was -- mitt romney being one of the imperious -- to being one of them. >> on the other side of the leisure, they never released a math and with a scribbled all of the house -- on the other side of the ledger him, they never released a nafta and where they scribbled on of the ideas. we have had an election. shut those two ideas still be on the table the that the president -- should those two idea still be on the table when the president and the speaker are in the room together? >> it doesn't have to be done right now. it is not as much risk. we should deal with it and we should. whe
of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal s
an education or serve in our military. but i think we're going to be on that comprehensive. >> better than a 50% chance you have a comprehensive solution? >> i think. so i think there is going to be a subject of a lot of debate and discussion and we're going to need the scholars at the prom today and folks to help us think through this, do you take it as a series or comprehensive bill. >> i think it's hard to take an issue on which a lot of people agree and get action on it unless there's trust that some of the other issues that are maybe have less consensus have trust those issue also also get addressed. that's one of the reasons comprehensive immigration reform is attractive to ensure all the immigration issues get addressed at once. it's a reason that the senator's start up 2.0 bill is attractive is because it sees other issues. i want to pose another way that you could view the highly educated immigrant as part of a larger issue and that the non-instruction for our own students. what i see happening in many of the stitesths states and a greatly renude emphasis in why american students are n
findings of a legislative committee study. >>> plus, a conversation with an education innovator, sal khan, on a mission to bring a free world class education to anyone, anywhere. >> it's really about the student taking ownership of their own learning. >> coming up next. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." big news today from the u.s. supreme court on gay marriage. before we get to our other topics, we'll briefly discuss that with our panelists. joining me tonight are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end.
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
, they are children who really didn't have a choice. they are here. they have been educated in america. we are trying to give them a legal status that does not allow a fear of deportation, and it allows them to go to college or school, allows them to stay here they want to. if they want to become citizens, they can apply and get in line and abide by theaw as it is today. we don't change the law would prohibit them. but we don't give them the cut in line for the people who have awaited for years to get that green card for the citizenship. gerri: switching gears here a little bit. he wrote an op-ed calling on washington. calling on congress and the president. not to raise taxes on small business operators. what would you like to see happen? >> i think we are going to rack this fragile economy if we raise taxes on the people who are creating jobs. they want to create jobs. we need to give the people and small business a stability and predictability. they need to know what to expect. all the president talks about his more taxes and more taxes. on top of health care, that is why we have not gotten any bet
is "education." which means it pays no taxes, and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests. i can go down there and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states, and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had them meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in american life, from health and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec
. we're the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the work force, the 21st-century jobs. that is what we get from higher education to work force training, the real obstacle and the income growth right now is having the best education systems. where we are producing the workers of the 21st century. second, we keep the bridges open and hopefully functional and rebuilt. we represent environmental policies to keep our water clear and take on the environmental challenges that we're facing. it is where the rubber hits the road that we need to get the results. we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets understand that they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with a vision on education, on ensuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force for the jobs that aring with created, so we can be the job creators and we see incomes rise on our constituent. that is what voters judge you by. when we come out and talk to candidates we go for job creators, folks who are going to create jobs in this
like trying to improve the education system. the fund mental things are what we need to work on. not just that we are growing faster in 2013 but for many years thereafter. >> christine, you make the point all the time. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at the numbers and compare the average to those with college degree, it's half. the unemployment rate is half. >> i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. they have a degree, student debt. they're not in the labor market yet. the first job you have. the first foot on. the first foot on the ladder is so important to lifetime achievement. it's a country eating your young. good education but there is an opportunity for the education once you get into the labor market. >> christine, diane, ken. thanks for joining us. good conversation about the jobs report. let's see what the future holds in terms of jobs. all right. does this man scare you? if you're a republican in congress the answer is probably yes. in the last three weeks, more lawmakers have said they are don
and celebrated persons in recovery and helped to educate and inform others about the process of recovery. we know that almost 1 in 10 americans struggle with a substance use disorder and that about 1 in 5 americans has a mental health problem. treatment and recovery are the pathway forward for these individuals, a pathway that leads to improved family relationships, health and well-being, hope for the future, and purpose in the sustainment of their recovery. as we hear and see their stories, we learn that recovery happens through many different pathways and that, in every marked by care, acceptance, and respect. this year marks the 22nd year of recovery month , and this year we have broadened it to incorporate recovery from mental health problems along with substance use disorders. recovery should be the common goal, whether one is dealing with mental or substance use disorders, or both. i encourage you to visit recoverymonth.gov to learn more about the celebrations, events, and the 2011 theme: join the voices for recovery. recovery benefits everyone. this is an important effort, to try to make s
thing. there are possibly other things which are trickier, like trying to improve the education system, but sort of these fundamental things, what we need to work on. not just that we're growing a little faster in 2013, but for many years there after. >> christine, you make this point all the time, actually. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at these numbers and compare the average to those with a college degree. it's half. the unplace of employment rate is half. >> it is, but i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. so they've got a degree, debt, they're not in the labor market yet, so they haven't been able to get into that group that has half the employment of everything else. they're having a tough time and as we know, that first job you have, that first foot on the first rung -- >> those sort, up to the age of 30 is higher. up to 11. >> that first step on the ladder is so important to your lifetime earnings, achievement. as a country, it's eati ining y if you can't figure out a good edge kax, but there's an opp
security, improving education, particularly k-12 education, which the american public in this poll said is fundamentally important for a competitive nation and for the success of our next generation. they want solutions. they're very hopeful, but they want solutions. they want leaders to compromise. in this poll, as in all, a majority of both parties said their leadership should compromise with the opposition even if it means they accept the policies they do not agree with and if that means some policies around which they decided to vote for the presidential candidate of their choice. consistent with what everything we have been hearing and reading, they do rank debt and the deficit very highly as a priority for elected officials to get done, to compromise, and get to work. they also made it very clear what they have made clear in every one of our previous 14 polls, and they want the debate be connected to their real life and to things they needed to survive in the economy. the kitchen table discussion is important to them, so those priorities are poured to their mind, and they want goo
. and millions in lottery ticket to go to education to make our kids smarter, today, sadly, they are only getting dumber. while we open our hearts let's not lose our minds. the folks deserve better to be locked out of a lockbox, and to be taken by greedy politicians who find other uses on the backs of that. not fair, not right. not remotely the thing to do. to staten islander john d'backo who knows of what i speak. he took matters in his own hand with his brother and buddies, made things right, here is john on the phone with the story. you quickly seize the initiative and did a lot more on just a local level. than fema. >> well, neil, as you know my house was affected my family was, but after stabilizing our situation we took a look around two days later, and we saw a bunch of federal response, out there with clip boards taking notes but we did not see boots on the ground helping people. yes my brother derrick and a few of hour close friends got out there, and started up a volunteer 100% grassroots effort, mobilized within a day or two over a hundred volunteers, and at this point we probably take
support people in recovery, not only with our encouraging words but also with housing, education, and employment. recovery month events make the faces of recovery visible in the community, highlighting the fact that people in recovery are our family members, friends, and neighbors. and it underscores the need for ongoing support for those who have beat addiction and mental illness and are now living happy and productive lives in recovery. we have seen rallies, jamborees, block parties, sporting events, motorcycle rides, community walks, wellness activities, and art shows among the many events listed on the recovery month web site. participants in these events have experienced fun and fellowship. we want to thank the thousands of people responsible for organizing recovery month events. your creativity and dedication is inspiring. we are making a difference by making these events possible. it's the miracle of sobriety, but we've got to do it together, right? so can i get a big cheer for doing it one day at a time, together? (cheering) this kind of an event is not only geared to hel
for something fun and educational to do together. nature spot quest is our spot. opened in march 2011 with more than 7,000 square feet of interactive educational things to do and see, the exhibit has the feel of a playground and the educational tools of classroom. every nook and cranny offers children a new adventure. unlike traditional museums, at naturequest children are challenged from self-discovery to explore and be curious in a hands-on environment just like real scientists. with over 100 interactive encounters to choose from, a few of my son's favorites include the clubhouse build in the trees and human fossils and the simulating river that seems to be swimming when they step on it. >> naturequest is this amazingly fun world that's scientifically lis tick. you can explore from the oceans and top of the mountains and everywhere you look there's something to do, something to find. >> what does a 2-year-old care about science? >> not much, but my son has so much fun exploring he doesn't lielz his little brain is working too. ann clair stapleton, cnn, atlanta. [ male announcer ] when it come
on the really important things that make a difference from job creation. we are the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the workforce of 21st century jobs. that is what democratic governors get. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they hav
. joining me this morning is meg, the president of the national education association of virginia. we also have national nea representative dennis roikle with us as well. thank you for coming in so early this morning. >> good to be here. >> i want to start with you. overing picture, -- overarching picture, what is the big picture? what can we stand to lose because of the cliff? >> if nothing is double, it will be across the -- is done, it will be across the board cuts that translates into $4.8 billion. it will impact nine million kids, including 80,000 in head start. it will take a million dollars out of special education and we'll do awfully those cuts to kids and education so the wealthiest 2% of americans can have a tax cut. doesn't make sense. >> you're talking about spending on the federal level. you have to think about the money flowing through local coffers. fairfax county, the biggest school district in our region but a lot of people at home might be surprised that a quarter of kids are on reduced or free lunches. can they get by without those? >> they can't. when we look at the cu
people, educate them, maybe some good of good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, t
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
schools more competitive and at least one education watcher is hearing all of this and worrying about the costly fixes and wondering, if we are just compounding the problem. our guest is from the education action group much the longer you are in school the more you are inclined to remember what you learn, the smarter you get, the more competitive our kids get and on and on. >>guest: that seems good on its face but you have this notion that quantity is better than quality. what states need to look at is quality. the type of instructor, are they effective? ineffective? the trouble is, we have fought been able to determine that because we don't have a good evaluation system for teachers and unions are blocking that and protecting ineffective teachers. >> there is no guarantee that the districts that the effective teachers will teach more? >>guest: no, if you have ineffective teacher it doesn't matter how long your kid in there. what you need to focus is on teacher quality. what makes an effective teacher? that is what they should focus on. >>neil: leak you i travel a bit and around the w
competitiveness to education. the new number one in most cases, a scandinavian country. what is the secret sauce? we'll dig into it. >>> but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here's something president obama could probably do by himself that would be a single accomplish money of the his presidency. end the war on tar rohr. for the first time since 9/11 an official has raised the prospect. johnson said in a speech to the oxford last week as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point at which so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda and its affiliates have been killed or captured such that as al qaeda as wi know it has been effectively destroyed. at that point, he says, our efforts should no longer be considered an armed conflict. you might not realize it, but we're still living in a state of war. this is the longest since the civil war, world war i, world war ii. it grants the president and federal government extraordinary authorities, effectively extends civil liberties for anyone the gov
to education, the new number one in most cases a scandinavian country, what is the credit sauce? we'll dig into it. but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here is something president obama could do probably by himself that would be a single accomplishment of his presidency, end the war on terror. for the first time since 9/11, an administration official has raised this prospect. said in a speech to the oxford union last week, that as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point as so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda have killed or captures such as al qaeda as we know it has been effectively destroyed. our efforts should no lo loaninger -- this is the longest period that the united states has lived in such a situation. longer than the civil war, world war i, world war ii, it grants the government extraordinary authorities and effectively suspends civil liberties for anyone the government deems the minute and also keeps us at a permanent war feeting in all kinds of ways, endsing thi
for college education as well. >> dealing with the mortgage interest deduction would hurt the middle class. >> if you take it in isolation. it depends how you balance it off. the rubric for us is, in has to be balanced. it has to be fair. it has to be comprehensive. it should be on the table to be discussed. we do not think that randomly you can pick things out, without understanding the unintended consequences that would provide. >> on the mortgage interest deduction -- i have a bill setting out there, trying to garner some republican support, that takes away the mortgage interest deduction for yachts that count as second homes. mr. larsen is talking about a schoolteacher trying to make sure it is affordable to buy a home, while there is a mortgage interest deduction available to people who buy yachts. that is coming from the person who represents the land of 10,000 lakes. i do not see a yacht in minnesota. that is the type of reform we are talking about. instead of signing on for that, they come to the middle class. that is where the frustration and fairness lies. >> we have heard from y
achievements, i have to tell you that what really moves my heart is what you have done for education, for kids in new york city and around the world, the 30 countries you've been to, the school programs you have initiated especially as we do less and less music education in our schools. i want to thank you for that. >> thank you very much. it's a blessing. >> talk to me about this anniversary and the importance of a quarter century of jazz at music center at lincoln center. >> i think we've had the opportunity to work as a community and meet with people all over the world, really, for the purposes of using jazz and the arts to uplift people and bring them together. and the education programs have been so well received. we have about 12 of them that cover kids of all ages from our little infants to jazz in the schools, we're going to be in -- we'll do 120 performances in the new york city public schools alone and we have essentially ellington, a high school jazz band festival and jazz competition we've been doing for 18 years and it's really been a blessing for parents and kids, so pane of our
increasing education. very educated people tend to not like trial and error. productivity drops and the rate of innovation drops. tavis: you mentioned the uk. how does this notion of "antifragile" apply in a place like egypt right now? >> the way i was complaining about egypt before the arab spring. when you suppress political life -- political life loves volatility. switzerland is a perfect place where you have volatility at the municipal level, but nothing of talk. the exact perfect on stable system is like saudi arabia or egypt. egypt before the arab spring, we had no information for 40 years. no information. a system artificially stabilized and you have hidden risks under the surface and you do not know what they are. that is what happened with the arab spring and now we are seeing things and it may turn into a total mess. the system is fragile last by depriving it from some rigid depriving it of political ofatility -- depriving it political volatility. tavis: doesn't always lead to greater strength? >> you want to -- does it always lead to greater strength? >> you want to favor the syst
that the states get for that deregulation will go to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. depende
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national-security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need to
, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> we have been telling you about these two unlikely but powerful men who have teamed up to fight for same sex marriage in california. they say it is not a matter of being republican or democrat, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too
justice -- getting education is a social justice issue. we don't want kids to feel they can't go to school or go home. we want other's worth intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a diffe
they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still deni
. and education could be cut by more than $4 billion. 100,000 children could lose their place in headstart. the white house says more than 25,000 teachers and aides could lose their jobs. the national education association, it puts that number even higher, closer 2080,000 jobs lost. mark moriel is the president of the national urban league and will cain is a cnn contributor and jane zahadi is a writer at cnn money. mark, all of this, all of this, is if they go over the fiscal cliff and they don't fix it, and they never fix it, right, the worst case scenario. my question for you. so much talk about taxes for the rich but isn't it true if the sequester goes into effect and isn't fix this will d disproportionately hurt the poor? >> it would because it would be tax increases on middle and working class americans and hard cuts across the board in defense and domestic programs, including education and job training so there's -- >> 700,000 mothers and children will lose nutrition assistance and 80,000 fewer child care subsidies and 14,000 fewer homeless would receive assistance. this is what agen
monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still denied. john:
job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to rger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apppparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters still denied. john: six times. this is typical. >
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